Aliiolani Hale

Also known as: Judiciary Building
King St., Honolulu, Hawaii

Photos 

NORTHEAST (FRONT) ELEVATION, GENERAL VIEW SHOWING SETTING

Photo taken for the Historic American Buildings Survey

Map 

Description 

Begun in 1871, the Aliiolani Hale was officially opened by the legislature on April 30, 1874. The design is an adaptation by Robert Stirling, Superintendent of Public Works, from a design for a palace for King Kamehameha V submitted by Thomas Rowe, architect, Sydney, Australia. The exterior bearing walls of large molded concrete blocks are original, this being one of the earliest uses of this building material in the United States. The interior has undergone a series of changes which seem to have removed completely any vestiges of the original. Major alterations in 1911-12 by Ripley and Reynolds, architects, completed the transformation with a new structural system of steel and concrete. In addition, the existing octagonal rotunda and cast iron stairways date from this period. In 1941-42, the large addition to the rear (makai) practically doubled the original building. Having housed various government functions throughout its history, it finally came into possession of the courts and is now commonly known as the Judiciary Building. -- Historic American Buildings Survey

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on February 2, 1972
Reference number
72000414
Architectural styles
Victorian: Renaissance; Other architectural type; Italian Renaissance
Areas of significance
Politics/Government; Architecture
Level of significance
National
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; C - Design/Construction
Property type
Building
Historic functions
Courthouse; Government office
Current function
Courthouse
Periods of significance
1875-1899; 1850-1874
Significant years
1871; 1874; 1893
Number of properties
Contributing buildings: 1
Contributing objects: 1

Update Log 

  • May 17, 2012: Imported photos from HABS/HAER

Sources