Gillisonville Baptist Church

U.S. 278, Gillisonville, South Carolina

Photo 

Gillisonville Baptist Church, Facade

South Carolina Department of Archives and History

View this photo at nationalregister.sc.gov

Map 

Street View 

Description 

The church and a dwelling are the remains of the old town of Gillisonville (one-time seat of the old Beaufort District), which was burned by Sherman’s Army in 1865. The church was constituted in 1832 as the summer home of Coosawatchie Baptist Church so it might escape the insects and “fever” of the hot summer months. It was built in 1838 and named Gillisonville Baptist Church in 1885. The Greek Revival style church is sheathed in white clapboard with brick foundation piers. The portico is supported by Doric columns on pedestals, and has a gable roof. The square tower which rises from the gable ridge pole contains two sections. The first is enclosed but possesses a section which may have been open formerly. The second, which contains the bell, is open. Its roof is supported by four round columns. It was apparently constructed by local craftsmen and possesses many original features such as boxed pews, random width flooring, and a former slave balcony in the rear supported by chamfered columns. The church and cemetery is surrounded by ancient moss laden trees. The church was used as headquarters for a contingent of Union troops during the Civil War. The old communion set was etched by a Union soldier “War of 1861-2-3-4. Feb. 1865. This is done by a Yankee soldier.” Listed in the National Register May 14, 1971. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on May 14, 1971
Reference number
71000786
Architectural style
Mid 19th Century Revival: Exotic Revival
Areas of significance
Military; Architecture
Level of significance
Local
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; C - Design/Construction
Property type
Building
Historic function
Religious structure
Current function
Religious structure
Periods of significance
1850-1874; 1825-1849
Significant years
1838; 1865

Update Log 

  • September 17, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "Description" & "Street View" and Imported Photo
  • September 17, 2014: Photo imported by Michael Miller

Sources