Good Hope Baptist Church

SC 378 near Sandhill Rd., Eastover, South Carolina

Photos 

West Side of Church

Listed on the National Register Site# 86000537. Good Hope was constructed in 1857 and is one of the few remaining antebellum churches in the area.

Photo taken by Grover Rye

Map 

Street View 

Description 

Good Hope Baptist Church, located in the Sandhills of Richland County, is significant architecturally as one of the few remaining antebellum churches in lower Richland County. This frame, temple-form Greek Revival building, which retains its original slave gallery, began as a branch of Congaree Baptist Church, located eight miles to the south. It was reportedly constructed in 1857 by John McLauchlin, an active member of the Congaree church. At the 1857 meeting of the association, Congaree Church reported being “engaged in erecting a new house of worship,” and by the 1858 meeting, “had built a new church for convenience of distant poor and other members at their summer seat.” A two-story frame addition to the north dates from 1950 and repeats the materials and proportions of the original building. Situated on land given by James H. Seay, owner of Laurelwood, located a few hundred yards from the church, it was not organized as a separate church until 1866. While an independent body, Good Hope maintained close ties with Congaree Baptist, as they shared a minister, Charles Augustus Stiles, for many years, holding services on alternating Sundays. Good Hope Baptist Church remains active to the present time. The property also contains a cemetery where many of the church’s former members are buried. Listed in the National Register March 27, 1986. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on March 27, 1986
Reference number
86000537
Architectural style
Mid 19th Century Revival: Exotic Revival
Areas of significance
Architecture; Religion
Level of significance
State
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; C - Design/Construction
Property type
Building
Historic function
Religious structure
Current function
Religious structure
Period of significance
1850-1874
Significant year
1857

Update Log 

  • October 14, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "Description" & "Street View"
  • October 14, 2014: New Street View added by Michael Miller
  • September 8, 2010: New photos from Grover Rye

Sources