Hopkins Graded School

Also known as: Old Hopkins School
Jct. of CR 37 and CR 1412, Hopkins, South Carolina

Photo 

Hopkins Graded School, Facade

South Carolina Department of Archives and History

View this photo at nationalregister.sc.gov

Map 

Street View 

Description 

Hopkins Graded School is significant as an intact small, rural, late nineteenth century school, a rapidly disappearing building type. In addition, the school is significant in the history of education in the Hopkins community in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. According to local tradition, the Hopkins Graded School was constructed ca. 1897 as a one-teacher school serving the white children of the area. Because of a growing enrollment, before 1914 a new two-story school was built across the road. After that the Hopkins Graded School building was used as a teacherage with the principal and his family being the first occupants. The school is a rambling, one-story building that has a L-shaped, frame core with weatherboard siding and a gable roof. A cross-gabled block is on the east end of the building, and three small cross-gabled entrance vestibules are on the east, south, and west elevations. A small square belfry with a pyramidal roof is located on the roof ridge at the east end of the L, and two brick chimneys pierce the ridge of the north wing of the L. The roof has purlins and rafter tails extended to carry deep eaves; roofing is modern sheet metal. Listed in the National Register March 27, 1986. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on March 27, 1986
Reference number
86000540
Areas of significance
Education; Architecture
Level of significance
State
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; C - Design/Construction
Property type
Building
Historic function
School
Periods of significance
1900-1924; 1875-1899
Significant year
ca. 1897

Update Log 

  • October 15, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "Description" & "Street View" and Imported Photo
  • October 15, 2014: Photo imported by Michael Miller

Sources