United Charities Building Complex

Also known as: United Charities Building, Kennedy Building, Dockbuilder's Tra
105 E. 22nd St,. 289 Park Ave. S. and 111-113 E. 22nd St., New York, New York

Map 

Street View 

Description 

Completed in 1893 and built entirely at the expense of a wealthy businessman, this building was intended to provide charitable groups with a central building and lower rent than they would have elsewhere. The original tenants were the Charities Organizations Society, the Association for the Improvement of the Condition of the Poor, the Children's Aid Society, and the New York City Mission and Tract Society; a later and perhaps most important tenant was the National Consumer's League, an influential reform organization which fought for legislation regulating child labor, women's labor, and wages and hours in general. -- National Historic Landmark statement of significance, July 17, 1991

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on March 28, 1985
Reference number
85000661
Architectural styles
Victorian: Romanesque; Victorian: Renaissance
Areas of significance
Social History; Architecture; Education
Levels of significance
National; Local
Evaluation criteria
B - Person; C - Design/Construction
Property type
Building
Historic function
Civic
Current functions
Civic; Organizational; Multiple dwelling
Periods of significance
1875-1899; 1900-1924
Significant years
1892; 1897; 1915
Number of properties
Contributing buildings: 3

Tags 

19th Century (36,347)
Brick (42,457)
Building (3,903)
Built 1892 (687)
Built during 1890s (7,186)
Ceramic tile (3,230)
Granite (5,090)
Have Street View (34,810)
James Baker (1)
Limestone (8,192)
National Historic Landmark (2,190)
New York (5,841)
New York County, New York (521)
New York, New York (724)
Private owner (54,396)
Renaissance (1,326)
Robert H. Robertson (6)
Romanesque (2,699)
Terra cotta (3,922)
Victorian (19,690)

Update Log 

  • April 21, 2017: New Street View added by Michael Miller

Related landmarks 

Sources