J. Wesley Brooks House

Also known as: Scotch Cross House
2 mi. S of Greenwood on U.S. 25, Greenwood, South Carolina

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Scotch Cross Plantation House

Photo taken by Michael Miller

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Description 

The J. Wesley Brooks House, built in 1815, is a two-story, white clapboard house that rests upon high brick supports and is an outstanding example of Federal architecture with Palladian features. The house also has a portico in the Greek Revival style. J. Wesley Brooks built the home for his wife Anne Lipscomb. The house’s heavy timbers were hand-sawed from trees that grew on the site and were put together with hand-hewn wooden pegs. Original hardwood floors remain intact throughout the house. The façade features a double-tiered portico with pediment surmounting the second level portico with a Palladian motif. The large double doorway has a delicate semi-elliptical radiating fanlight above and sidelights embellished with a geometric design formed by a series of semicircular muntins. The four fluted pilasters, which flank the sidelights and doorway, have capitals decorated with the semi-elliptical patera design. The J. Wesley Brooks House is located at the intersection of two very old thoroughfares, Mathews Road and Barksdale Ferry Road, both of which are now modern highways. According to family tradition, a landscape designer from Charleston planned the front garden. One half acre in the front was outlined for shrubs, flowers, and trees, and the flower garden at one time held fifty varieties of roses. Listed in the National Register March 30, 1973. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on March 30, 1973
Reference number
73001712
NR name
Brooks, J. Wesley, House
Architectural style
Other architectural type; Palladian
Area of significance
Architecture
Level of significance
Local
Evaluation criteria
C - Design/Construction
Property type
Building
Historic function
Single dwelling
Current function
Single dwelling
Period of significance
1800-1824
Significant year
1815

Update Log 

  • September 15, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "Description" & "Street View"
  • September 15, 2014: New Street View added by Michael Miller
  • February 7, 2014: New photos from Michael Miller

Sources