Mann-Simons Cottage

Also known as: Simons Cottage, The Mann-Simons Cottage
1403 Richland St., Columbia, South Carolina

Photo 

Mann-Simons Cottage, Facade

South Carolina Department of Archives and History

View this photo at nationalregister.sc.gov

Map 

Street View 

Description 

The Mann-Simons Cottage, built ca. 1850, is an important site that illustrates a wide range of African American history. As the antebellum home of a substantial free black Columbia family, it is the prototype survivor of a cluster of houses belonging to a significant group in Columbia’s population before the Civil War. The cottage is a reminder that, during the antebellum period, free blacks lived and associated with the white community a great deal more than has heretofore been realized. Celia Mann, the earliest known owner of the house, was instrumental in establishing an early, post-Civil War, black church in the city. The First Calvary Baptist Church was organized in the Simons Cottage, with religious services held in the basement. Her daughter, Agnes Jackson, married Bill Simons, a free black musician who played with the local Joe Randal Band. The home is a one-and-one-half story cottage style house with a raised basement and a gabled roof with two corbel-capped chimneys. The façade has a porch that is supported by four brick posts. The porch roof is supported by four Tuscan columns and is enclosed by a balustrade. Listed in the National Register April 23, 1973. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on April 23, 1973
Reference number
73001726
Architectural style
Other architectural type; Columbia Cottage
Areas of significance
Ethnic Heritage - Black; Social History; Performing Arts
Level of significance
Local
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; B - Person
Property type
Building
Historic function
Single dwelling
Periods of significance
1875-1899; 1850-1874
Significant years
ca. 1850; 1875

Update Log 

  • October 16, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "Description" & "Street View" and Imported Photo

Sources