Wheatlands

NW of Sevierville on Old Knoxville Hwy., Sevierville, Tennessee

Photos 

Front View Looking East

Photo taken by Bob Davis

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Map 

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on July 7, 1975
Reference number
75001785
Architectural styles
Victorian: Queen Anne; Federal
Area of significance
Architecture
Level of significance
Local
Evaluation criteria
C - Design/Construction
Property type
Building
Historic functions
Single dwelling; Agricultural outbuildings
Current function
Single dwelling
Period of significance
1825-1849
Significant year
1825
Number of properties
Contributing buildings: 2
Non-contributing buildings: 2

Tags 

19th Century (37,730)
Built 1825 (185)
Built during 1820s (1,813)
Federal (4,596)
House (27,613)
John Chandler (4)
Private owner (54,398)
Queen Anne (5,128)
Sevier County, Tennessee (64)
Sevierville, Tennessee (17)
Tennessee (2,858)
Victorian (19,698)

Update Log 

  • March 17, 2012: New photo from Bob Davis

Sources 

Comments 

Wheatlands Details
Posted December 30, 2012, by Bob Davis (bobdaviscfi [at] earthlink [dot] net)

"Nine rooms complete the home and the bricks of which it is constructed, were made from clay on the place. It has never been rebuilt, except for the windows and a few doors which were replaced after the Civil War, when the original ones were destroyed.

"The doors have hand wrought hinges, the fireplaces are large and uneven and it has many builtin cupboards, as they were known in the old days. The basement runs the full length of the first floor. The wide stairways add to the distinctiveness of the old home, and even the old plastered walls are intact.

"The front stairway is English. ...woodwork is heart pine ... The (stairway) woodwork is ivory and the colonial mantels that were part of the original construction still remain.' from the Knoxville Journal, Sunday March 27, 1938, Section 3, page 8, "Home Built Century Ago Has Warmth, Now Kept as Shrine to Family," by Pauline Smith. "On a marble slab over the door, is chiseled the name of the home - "The Ler-Mac." at that time the home was occupied by descendants S. Tim McMahan and his son, S. Tim McMahan, Jr.