William Rogers House

Also known as: Tindal House
531 W. Church St., Bishopville, South Carolina

Photo 

William Rogers House, Facade

South Carolina Department of Archives and History

View this photo at nationalregister.sc.gov

Map 

Street View 

Description 

The William Rogers House was built ca. 1845 in a vernacular interpretation of the Greek Revival style. The front façade features a large two-story pedimented portico. This portico has four large square, frame columns with Doric motif capitals. In the gable field of the pediment is an elliptical blind window with sawtooth wood shingles. The three central bays of the house on the main facade have narrow flushboard siding with wider weatherboard siding on the rest of the house. The house has two exterior end brick chimneys with a stucco finish. At the rear of the building are several one-story additions made in the late nineteenth century. The interior of the house retains its original woodwork, staircase, and mantels. During the early 1840s, William Rogers, a Connecticut native, moved to Bishopville to open a store. In 1850, Rogers is listed as residing in Bishopville with his wife and seven children. Roger’s grandson was Thomas G. McLeod, who served as South Carolina’s governor from 1923 to 1927. During his childhood McLeod was a frequent visitor to this home but there is no evidence that he ever resided here. The Rogers family continued to own this house until the 1890s when it was sold to the Tatum family. Listed in the National Register January 9, 1986. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on January 9, 1986
Reference number
86000047
NR name
Rogers, William, House
Architectural styles
Mid 19th Century Revival: Exotic Revival; Other architectural type; Vernacular Greek Revival
Areas of significance
Commerce; Architecture
Level of significance
Local
Evaluation criteria
C - Design/Construction; B - Person
Property type
Building
Historic function
Single dwelling
Current function
Single dwelling
Periods of significance
1850-1874; 1825-1849
Significant year
ca. 1845

Update Log 

  • September 22, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "Description" & "Street View" and Imported Photo
  • September 22, 2014: Photo imported by Michael Miller

Sources