William P. Stroman House

1017 N. Boulevard, Orangeburg, South Carolina

Photo 

William P. Stroman House, Left Oblique

South Carolina Department of Archives and History

View this photo at nationalregister.sc.gov

Map 

Street View 

Description 

The William P. Stroman House is significant as a fine example of late Neo-Classical residential architecture. The architectural firm of Lafaye and Lafaye designed the house. Based in Columbia, Lafaye and Lafaye were recognized as one of the state’s leading architectural firms at the time. They designed many significant public and private structures throughout South Carolina, including buildings at the State Hospital for the Insane in Columbia and the State Training School in Clinton. The firm was active in Orangeburg designing other Neo-Classical structures such as the First National Bank Building and the Dr. E.O. Horger House, located across the street from the Stroman House. The house, constructed in 1926, includes numerous elements of Neo-Classical design such as a symmetrical arrangement, a full-height porch, Doric columns, a pediment, cornices with dentils and a Greek Revival entrance. It is a brick residence with a roof of Spanish tiles. Included on the property are two contributing outbuildings, a garage and a greenhouse. Listed in the National Register August 1, 1996. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on August 1, 1996
Reference number
96000836
NR name
Stroman, William P., House
Architectural style
Late 19th and 20th Century Revival: Classical Revival
Area of significance
Architecture
Level of significance
Local
Evaluation criteria
C - Design/Construction
Property type
Building
Historic function
Single dwelling
Current function
Single dwelling
Period of significance
1925-1949
Significant years
1925; 1926
Number of properties
Contributing buildings: 3

Update Log 

  • October 3, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "Description" & "Street View" and Imported Photo
  • October 3, 2014: Photo imported by Michael Miller

Sources