Springfield Bridge

Abandoned
For more details on this bridge, please
visit our companion Bridgehunter.com website
Also known as: FAO852
CR 222 at Cadron Creek, Springfield, Arkansas

Iron bowstring truss bridge over Cadron Creek near Springfield on the Conway-Faulkner County line

Photos 

Oblique View

Photo taken by Wayne Kizziar April 2004

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Map 

HISTORY of Springfield-Des Arc Bridge 

arkansashighways.com/historic_bridge

CONSTRUCTION DELAYS
In January 1872, J. W. Smith and S.S. Bedinger, owners of a bridge one-and-a-half miles
from the Point Remove bridge site, brought a grievance against the county bridge commissioners,
- claiming that the new bridge was unnecessary, on a road seldom traveled, and located adjacent to
SPRINGFIELD-DES ARC BRIDGE
HAER NO. AR-32
PAGE 5
property owned by one of the bridge commissioners, A.D. Thomas. Upon investigation, the court
found that "contracts were made . . . with no restrictions as to the cost of erecting said bridges .
. . thereby leaving the county at the mercy of the commissioners and the bridge company. "(10) The
court, therefore, cancelled the contract for the Point Remove Bridge and ordered a review of the
Springfield-Des Arc Bridge. As a result of these proceedings, A.D. Thomas resigned from the
bridge commission, and Judge Gaylor lost his bid for re-election.(ll)
Although the Springfield-Des Arc Bridge was found to be a necessary improvement, its
construction was further delayed by the formation of Faulkner County in April 1873. Part of
Conway County broke off to form part of the new county, and Cadron Creek became the new county
- boundary. Since half of the Springfield-Des Arc Bridge site was in the new county, Conway County
filed a lawsuit against Faulkner County for half the cost of the bridge.(l2) To further complicate
the situation, the Conway County seat moved from Springfield to Lewisburg that same year.
The matter of the Springfield-Des Arc Bridge was not resolved until January 1874, when the
Conway County Court appointed Thomas J. Durham as the new bridge commissioner, and authorized
funding for the project. The court chose George B. Preston, "to erect said bridge upon the terms
of the original contract heretofore made with the amendment to said contract that the bridge be
received by the Bridge Commissioners at its present sight (sic) now situated north of
Lewisburgh. "(13) The bridge was completed in July at a cost of $12,857.(14) On July 21, 1874

New information

Written by Kenneth Barnes and Carol Rolf

http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2015/aug/16/historical-society-seeks-preserve-1870s-structure/

“We’ve talked to the cities and the counties involved, and the Conway County judge has turned over ownership to Faulkner County. We’ve talked to the city of Conway, Mayor [Tab] Townsell and Steve Ibbotson, director of Conway Parks and Recreation, and they have agreed — in principle, at least — to incorporate the bridge into the Tucker Creek bike/walk trail system — somewhere to be determined.”
The Conway City Council, during its May 26 meeting, voted 7-0 to “accept the acquisition of the historic Springfield Bowstring Bridge.”
According to the minutes of the City Council meeting, which can be found at cityofconway.org, “Mayor Townsell stated the bridge is 140 feet wide, which may or may not fit in Tucker Creek. We will have to make that decision as a council. Mayor Townsell explained the main criteria the [Faulkner County Historical Society] has is the bridge has to stand over water, and there are many options for that.”

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on July 21, 1988
Reference number
88000660
Architectural style
Other architectural type; Tubular Bowstring Arch
Areas of significance
Engineering; Transportation
Level of significance
State
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; C - Design/Construction
Property type
Structure
Historic function
Road-related
Current function
Road-related
Periods of significance
1900-1924; 1875-1899; 1850-1874
Significant years
1871; 1874

Update Log 

  • September 19, 2015: Essay added by Dennis Charles
  • July 23, 2010: New photos from Wayne Kizziar
  • July 19, 2010: New photo from Wayne Kizziar

Sources