Spratt Cemetery

Abandoned
Brickyard Rd., Fort Mill, South Carolina

Photo 

Spratt Cemetery, Cemetery Overview

South Carolina Department of Archives and History

View this photo at nationalregister.sc.gov

Map 

Street View 

Description 

The Spratt Cemetery is important as the resting place of one of the first European families to settle in the Fort Mill area. The cemetery is significant for its illustration of the broad pattern of settlement of the area and because it is associated with Thomas “Kanawha” Spratt, who was one of the first settlers of the area and had a major influence on the development of eastern York County. The site is also closely associated with Nation Ford Road because it is located adjacent to the site of Thomas “Kanawha” Spratt’s homestead. Spratt was traveling along Nation Ford Road in the 1750s when he came upon the Catawba Indians and was offered land in the area. The cemetery contains graves of three generations of the Spratt family, along with members of the White and Garrison families, other early settlers of the Fort Mill area. The cemetery consists of fourteen marked graves and approximately nine graves with broken stones or partial markers. It is surrounded by an eighteen inch thick rock and concrete wall with an iron gate. Funerary art includes carved eagles with arrows in their talons on the top of the stones for Thomas Spratt, Sr. and Thomas Spratt, Jr. Other stones are less decorated. Listed in the National Register March 1, 2007. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on March 1, 2007
Reference number
00000597
Area of significance
Exploration/Settlement
Level of significance
Local
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; B - Person
Property type
Site
Historic function
Cemetery
Current function
Cemetery
Periods of significance
1800-1824; 1825-1849; 1850-1874

Update Log 

  • October 29, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "GPS Coordinates", "Description" & "Street View" and Imported Photos
  • October 29, 2014: Photo imported by Michael Miller

Sources