Coming Street Cemetery

Also known as: Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Congregational Cemetery
189 Coming St., Charleston, South Carolina

Photos 

Coming Street Cemetery, Main Entrance

South Carolina Department of Archives and History

View this photo at nationalregister.sc.gov

Map 

Street View 

Description 

The Coming Street Cemetery, established in 1762, is privately owned by Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim (Holy Congregation of the House of God), a congregation whose synagogue is itself a National Historic Landmark. This cemetery is the oldest Jewish burial ground in the South. It is also significant for its association with the history of the Beth Elohim, a congregation established in 1749 and the birthplace of Reform Judaism in America in 1824; as the chief cemetery for Charleston’s significant Jewish community since the colonial era; and for its fine examples of late-eighteenth century and early nineteenth century gravestone art. The cemetery contains some six hundred marble and brownstone gravestones, most dating from the last half of the eighteenth century or the first half of the nineteenth century. It includes many box tombs, table-top tombs, obelisks, and columns, several of them fine examples of late-eighteenth and nineteenth century gravestone art, and many signed by such prominent local sculptors and stonecutters as A.F. Chevreaux, M. Gannon, G. Rennie, D.A. Walker, Edward R. White, and William T. White. Many gravestones feature Hebrew inscriptions and/or Jewish religious motifs. A perimeter stuccoed brick wall, part of it original, is an important feature of the site and has been a major factor in keeping the cemetery intact for over two hundred years. Listed in the National Register November 5, 1996. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on November 5, 1996
Reference number
96001223
Areas of significance
Social History; Religion; Art
Level of significance
National
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; C - Design/Construction
Property type
Site
Historic function
Cemetery
Current function
Cemetery
Periods of significance
1900-1924; 1875-1899; 1850-1874; 1825-1849; 1800-1824; 1750-1799
Significant years
1762; 1842; 1843

Update Log 

  • August 18, 2014: Photo imported by Michael Miller
  • July 14, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "Description" & "Street View"

Sources