Davidson Building

301-303 E. Park St., Anaconda, Montana

Photo 

Davidson Building

Photo HABS/HAER 1933 courtesy Library of Congress

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Description 

"Significance: Erected in 1896, the Davidson is one of the few remaining buildings in Anaconda which illustrate the city's rich commercial and architectural growth before 1900. The original structure measured 50 ft. on East Park Avenue and 100 ft. to the rear on Cherry Street. The cost of construction was $15,000. The building had two storefronts at the ground level with apartment space above. A 40 ft. extension was later added to the rear. An ornamental tower above the N.W. corner turret was removed sometime in the mid-twentieth century. T.C. Davidson, a native of Missouri moved to Deer Lodge county in 1882 to establish a cattle ranch. His property was subsequently purchased by the Anaconda Copper Company in 1883, and incorporated into the city's first land holdings. After purchasing a second ranch east of Anaconda, Davidson returned to reside in the newly founded city. He became a successful business man and acquired extensive holdings of business and residential property, most notably the Davidson Block. T.C. Davidson also remained active in community affairs throughout his career and served as county commissioner in 1901. In the twentieth century, the Davidson Block was the location of Coldwater's Shoe Store and the Stagg Apartments. Parson's Funeral Home is currently occupying the rear of this structure. The Community Development Agency now owns the Davidson Block. Building demolition is scheduled for the purpose of future mall development." - Survey number: HABS MT-53-N

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on January 19, 1983
Reference number
83001059
Areas of significance
Commerce; Architecture
Level of significance
Local
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; C - Design/Construction
Property type
Building
Period of significance
1875-1899
Significant year
1896

Update Log 

  • May 27, 2019: New photo from Richard Doody

Sources