Southern Terminal, Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal

Also known as: The Lock House, the Commons
N of Erie St. between Conesteo St. and the Susquehanna, Havre de Grace, Maryland

Photos 

The lock-keepers house

Photo taken by John Reidy

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Map 

Essay 

Information source: a plaque on the site written by Richard J. Sherrill

The 45-mile long Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal ran from Wrightsville, Pennsylvania to Havre de Grace, Maryland. The canal was built between 1835 and 1839 in order to improve commerce on the Susquehanna River. The new canal would connect the extensive Pennsylvania canal system with tidewater ports—primarily Baltimore and Philadelphia.
The canal opened for business in May 1840. Raw materials such as coal, iron ore, flint, lumber and grain were taken to navigable water. Products including groceries, dry goods, and agricultural supplies were sent back.
Traffic on the canal was very heavy reaching its peak in 1864. Unfortunately the canal was plagued by ongoing problems including lack of sufficient funds, legal disputes, railroad competition and storm related damage. Eventually the ravages of nature and the cost of repairs made continuation impractical. Pennsylvania’s Susquehanna Canal never reopened after a May 1984 flood. Maryland’s Tidewater Canal continued operation for local traffic until about 1900.

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on May 28, 1976
Reference number
76001000
Areas of significance
Engineering; Commerce; Transportation
Level of significance
State
Evaluation criteria
C - Design/Construction; A - Event
Property type
District
Historic functions
Hotel; Water-related; Single dwelling
Current functions
Park; Museum
Periods of significance
1825-1849; 1850-1874; 1875-1899
Significant years
1836; 1839
Number of properties
Contributing buildings: 1
Contributing structures: 1
Contributing sites: 2

Tags 

19th Century (36,415)
Brick (42,457)
Built 1836 (204)
Built during 1830s (2,664)
Canal (83)
Harford County, Maryland (93)
Havre de Grace, Maryland (5)
Marble (1,154)
Maryland (1,765)
Private owner (54,396)
Stone (26,162)

Update Log 

  • May 28, 2011: Essay added by John Reidy

Sources