Charleston Historic District

Also known as: Charleston Old and Historic District
An area roughly bounded by Broad, Bay, S. Battery and Ashley and an area along Church bounded by Cumberland and Chalmers, Charleston, South Carolina

Photos 

Photo taken by Michael Miller in January 2014

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Description 

Charleston played an important role in Colonial, Revolutionary, antebellum and Civil War America. The city was a major Colonial seaport, an active participant in the Revolution, a seat of rice and cotton culture and a leader of secession. Today much of the nation’s great social and architectural history can be visibly appreciated because of the great concentration of period buildings that still line the city streets. The historic district contains primarily residential buildings in addition to commercial, ecclesiastical, and government-related buildings. Several historic neighborhoods are included because of their concentrations of historically and architecturally valuable buildings. These neighborhoods possess the unique visual appeal of old Charleston, a picturesqueness created by the close proximity of buildings, in a wide variety of architectural styles. There is general harmony in terms of height, scale, proportion, materials, textures, colors, and characteristic forms, such as the side piazzas. All of the properties contribute to an expanded period of significance dating from 1700 to 1941. The great concentration of 18th and 19th century buildings give the district a flavor of an earlier America. The district contains many buildings of national historic and/or architectural significance. Built of brick, stucco, or clapboard, many of these properties are Charleston “single houses,” one room wide, with gable end to the street and tiered piazzas. Others are plantation style houses. Architectural styles include Georgian, Regency, Federal, Adamesque, Classical Revival, Greek Revival, Italianate, Gothic Revival, and Queen Anne, among others. The district also contains many outbuildings (stables, carriage houses, kitchen buildings), a majority of which have been altered extensively to accommodate modern needs. Listed in the National Register October 15, 1966; Designated a National Historic Landmark October 9, 1960; Boundary increases January 30, 1970; July 16, 1978; August 2, 1984; August 13, 1985; and March 27, 1986. Period of significance expansion (1900-1941) accepted October 6, 1988. - SCDAH

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966
Reference number
66000964
Architectural styles
Mid 19th Century Revival: Exotic Revival; Other architectural type; Federal; Charleston single house
Area of significance
Architecture
Level of significance
National
Evaluation criteria
C - Design/Construction
Property type
District
Historic function
Single dwelling
Current function
Single dwelling
Periods of significance
1700-1749; 1850-1874; 1800-1824; 1750-1799; 1825-1849

Update Log 

  • January 25, 2016: Photo imported by Michael Miller
  • March 30, 2015: New photos from Michael Miller
  • August 6, 2014: New photos from Michael Miller
  • July 11, 2014: New photos from Michael Miller
  • July 10, 2014: Updated by Michael Miller: Added "GPS Coordinates", "Alternate Name", "Description" & "Streetview"

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