Brocton Arch

Jct. of Main St. with Lake and Highland Aves., Brocton, New York

Thought to be the last extant four-way street arch in the United States

Photos 

Approaching from the east

Photo taken by J.R. Manning May 2018

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Street View 

Description 

"With unprecedented growth of the village, the Village of Brocton and Town of Portland wanted a symbol of its prosperity as the 'Home of the Concord Grape'. Many suggestions were made, but one was favored. At the time, municipal arches bearing community names and populations were familiar sites. So the idea of a double arch for Brocton was decided upon and approved by the Portland Centennial Association in 1913, the 100th birthday of the town. The association felt the arch would do for Brocton what the Eiffel Tower did for Paris.

"Only one change has been made to the arch since its construction. The original "Brocton" sign, hung from the corona, had become so corroded with time and weather that it was considered hazardous to pedestrians and motorists. In 1946 a neon lighted, "Brocton" sign was hung and the sign remains to the present.

"The twin arch still exists today as a monument of the community's pride. While not as impressive an engineering feat or architectural attraction as it once was, it remains an unforgettable landmark.

"Surviving the test of time and elements, it is believed to be the only remaining four-way street arch in the United States today.

"At dusk the arch is illuminated by 124 bulbs which switch off at midnight. in December, the white lights are mixed with red and green ones and Brocton's landmark gleams on the horizon as a jewel."

Condensed from a marker sign posted by the village. The complete text is shown with the sign, above.

National Register information 

Status
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on February 22, 1996
Reference number
96000133
Areas of significance
Community Planning and Development; Engineering
Level of significance
Local
Evaluation criteria
A - Event; C - Design/Construction
Property type
Structure
Historic function
Monument/marker
Current function
Monument/marker
Period of significance
1900-1924
Significant year
1913

Update Log 

  • May 30, 2018: New Street View added by Brian Bartlett
  • May 25, 2018: Updated by J.R. Manning: Updated status, added description and added photographs.

Sources