Ernest Flagg Stone Masonry Houses of Milwaukee County TR

View Exhibit map

Ernest Flagg was born in Broooklyn, New York on February 6, 1857 and left school at the age of 15 to become an office boy on Wall Street. His father and brother were in real estate, and after working with them for some time, in 1880, Flagg designed apartments.

 photo 220px-Ernest_Flagg_1911_zps1139d40d.jpg
Ernest Flagg, 1911

Flagg's cousin was Alice Claypoole Gwynne, who married Cornelius Vanderbilt II. Vanderbilt was impressed with Flagg's work and sent him to Paris to study at the famous École des Beaux-Arts in 1889. After returning to New York in 1891, Vanderbilt set him up to practice architecture, utilizing his learned skills of French architectural styles, later referred to as the school of Beaux-Arts. He was a supporter of height regulations, setbacks and zoning, which allows light to reach the street level.

Although Flagg is noted for his designs of large buildings, he also had strong opinions about dwellings. In 1922, he published his concepts in a book entitled Small Homes: Their Economic Design and Construction. He defined guidelines for homes costing less than $10,000 to build. He suggested savings in both labor and materials by eliminating expensive hardware and using prefabricated components.

Flagg's designs have common features which can be seen on several of the examples in this group. You'll notice steep roofs, ridge dormers (or skylights) that provide light and ventilation. You will also note mulitple chimneys in several of these homes. Flagg system homes are remarkable yet today because they are energy efficient.

Besides the approximately 20 homes built in the Milwaukee area by the Arnold F. Meyer & Company builders, Flagg is noted for his designs of the Scribner Building, Engine Company #33 and St. Luke's Hospital, all in New York, and his own residence on Long Island. He also designed the Singer Building in New York, with 47 floors, it is the tallest building ever intentionally demolished. (The World Trade Center was destroyed as an act of terrorism.) Flagg is also noted for the Naval Academy in Annapolis and the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Flagg died in 1947 at the age of 90.


Alfred M. Hoelz House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Barfield-Staples House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Erwin Cords House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Frank J. Williams House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Fred W. Ullius Jr., House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house.
Frederick Sperling House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
G. B. Van Devan House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
George E. Morgan House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
George Gabel House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
H. R. Davis House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Halbert D. Jenkins House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house.
Harrison Hardie House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Henry A. Meyer House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Horace W. Hatch House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house.
J. H. Fiebing House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
An Ernest Flagg home design in Flagg's well-known Beaux-Arts style.
John F. McEwens House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Otto F. Fiebing House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house.
Paul S. Grant House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Pearl C. Norton House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Rufus Arndt House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Seneca W. & Bertha Hatch House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Starke Meyer House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Thomas Bossert House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Warren B. George House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
William Van Altena House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house
Willis Hopkins House (Milwaukee County, Wisconsin)
Historically significant Ernest Flagg designed stone masonry house