Robinhood Free Meetinghouse

Also known as: Robinhood Free Meetinghouse Restaurant
210 Robinhood Rd., Georgetown, Maine

Photo 

Robinhood Free Meetinghouse, Georgetown Maine; 1855

Photo taken by Brian Bartlett

View this photo at panoramio.com

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Description 

The Robinhood Free Meetinghouse in rural Georgetown, Sadagahoc County, Maine is a two-story gable front Greek Revival building facing Robinhood Road to the south with Webber Road running north along the building’s west side. The building sits on a 0.57 acre lot on a forested rise of Georgetown Island approximately one half mile above the nearest cluster of buildings at Robinhood Cove, the nearest and only village on the island being Georgetown four miles south. The original three bay by three bay building was completed in 1856 with worship space on the second floor and vestry and school rooms on the first floor. Original construction with the second floor worship space is rare in 1856 Maine. Most meetinghouses or churches built in 1800s in Maine were constructed with the worship space on the first floor. Upon construction in 1856 the building was shared by both Methodists and Congregationalists. While second floor worship space is unusual, denominational sharing of space was not. It appears the original intent to include school space drove the building layout. It is also possible that designer, builder or a church member was familiar with this type of plan either as a rare original construction or as a renovation. This property is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C as a regionally rare form of two-story religious building from the mid-1800s. This religious building derives its primary significance as a rare original two-story architectural design that was achieved in many other buildings by renovation. The period of significance is 1856 the building’s construction date.

Update Log 

  • November 3, 2016: New Street View added by Brian Bartlett
  • February 18, 2014: Added by Brian Bartlett

Sources